Muzeum Historyczne w Sanoku

Iconostasis

The Orthodox and Greek Catholic Church art 12th – 20th c.

One of the most beautiful collection of art of the Orthodox and Greek Catholic church in Poland gathers over 1200 exhibits. The earliest examples of the Orthodox and Greek Catholic church art, icons and liturgical objects (utensils, wooden and polychromed handed crosses, engolpions, banners, robes, antique books) coming from existing or non-existing churches of south-eastern Poland and contemporary Ukraine, can be seen in chambers of the renaissance castle.

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Sacral art of the Roman Catholic Church 15th – 19th c.
The exhibition consists of exhibits coming from the old churches and chapels of the Przemyśl diocese. These are mainly works of anonymous authors presenting various level of skills. The baptismal font from the non-existent gothic church of St Michael the Archangel in Sanok is the oldest relic in this collection.
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Gallery of Zdzisław Beksiński

The biggest exhibition in the world (including about 600 works) presents rich and diverse creativity of one of the most interesting and intriguing contemporary artist. Having, to a large extent, author's profile the exhibition is a retrospective reflecting the development and stylistic-formal transformations of this art in the course of time.

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Pokuttyan ceramics

The collection of Pokuttyan ceramics, numbering over 500 exhibits, was donated to the museum by Aleksander Rybicki in 1978. It is the greatest collection in Poland. Pokuttya (Polish: Pokucie), it is a land located in the Eastern Carpathian Mountains in the upper Prut and Cheremosh rivers on territory of nowadays Ukraine. The local people, Hutsuls, occupied themselves with breeding, farming and craft.

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Portraits of the 17th – 19th c.
Special place in the collection of the Historical Museum has a group of portraits painting from the 16th – 19th century. Portrayed people were connected with the Sanok region due to their provenance, status and family relations. Most of these objects had been a possession of the Lithuanian gentry – Załuscy family from the palace in Iwonicz whose property was taken over after the World War II.
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